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CARDI B, MARIAH CAREY: Meeting of the Minds

Written by on February 24, 2021

Cardi B and Mariah Carey recently connected — but it wasn’t for new music. The hitmakers recently sat down for a conversation with Interview magazine. 

Mimi quizzed Bardi about everything from growing up in New York City, adapting to COVID-19, and racism in the fashion industry. Here are some highlights: 

  • Cardi on her average day: “During the pandemic, the average day is me waking up with a lot of ideas in my head, so I’m always calling my team, trying to make whatever I have in my head happen, or I’m wondering about a business venture so I call my lawyer. And sometimes I go on Twitter, I go to blogs, I see what’s going on in the world. I try to stay off it most of the time, because sometimes it’s such a bad vibe. I usually wake up around noon and my daughter wakes up at 3:00 pm, so I really have no time to just work, work, work, work.”
  • Cardi on getting glam during a pandemic: “Due to COVID, no lie, my team gets tested at least three or four times a week, no matter what we do. We always come up with things together. Let’s say I want to wear a shirt, I’ll send the shirt to my stylist and he will put an outfit together. Then I’ll hit up my hairstylist and we’ll decide what hairstyle goes with the fashion, because we don’t always have the same ideas. I was rehearsing for a music video and I had to be around dancers, and we were getting tested practically every single day. It’s so expensive on the budget.”
  • Cardi gives a status update on her next album: “I feel like I’m missing some songs. Everybody’s rushing me to put it out, but I don’t know if it’s the right time. When I do interviews, I like to be in people’s faces. I hate Zoom meetings. They’re just so weird. I like to do listening parties. You can’t even tour. That [stuff’s] wack as [hell].”
  • Whether the fashion industry is racist: “I don’t know if I would use the word “racism,” because everything is so technical right now. I have felt prejudice. I have been involved in endorsement deals, and then I found out that certain White people got more money for their deals from the same company. I do my research. I know how much money I made that company. My fans buy my [stuff]. So it’s like, ‘When you’re not paying me what you’re paying these other people, why is that?‘ It’s kind of insulting. And then when it comes to fashion, hip-hop is a big influence. And yet, Black artists have the hardest time getting pulls from designers and the hardest time getting seats at their fashion shows, and barely get endorsed by big fashion brands that we literally make trend.”

You can read more of their interview on Interview‘s website.


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